Breast Cancer Screening

In NYC

When it comes to breast cancer screening, Boruch Midwifery PC offers a unique, comprehensive risk analysis as well as genetic counseling to help you assess your cancer risk. We also evaluate the likelihood that Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOC) may be prevalent in your family by offering a genetic blood test called BRACAnalysis®. By understanding your cancer risk level, you can better determine appropriate surveillance measures, and possibly take part in risk-reducing strategies.

Are you at risk?

Are you at risk for hereditary breast cancer or ovarian cancer?  If you can say “yes” to two or more of the statements below, we urge you to schedule an appointment with Dr. Boruch.

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Have YOU had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has YOUR MOTHER had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has YOUR SISTER had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has YOUR DAUGHTER had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has YOUR MATERIAL GRANDMOTHER had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has a MATERNAL AUNT had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has YOUR PATERNAL GRANDMOTHER had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Has a PATERNAL AUNT had breast cancer at or before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age?

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Have there been 2 or more cases of breast cancer after age 50 on the same side of the family?

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Has there been male breast cancer at any age in any relative?

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Do you have Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry?

Breast Cancer Screening FAQs

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Who should schedule an appointment for genetic screening and counsuling?

Individuals with a personal or family history of:

  • Cancer diagnosed before age 50
  • Multiple close family members with the same or related cancers (for example: breast and ovarian cancer or colon and uterine cancer)
  • Two or more primary cancer diagnoses in the same individual
  • Rare cancers or tumors (for example: male breast cancer, triple negative breast cancer, medullary thyroid cancer, adrenocortical carcinoma or pheochromocytoma)
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Other features associated with a hereditary cancer syndrome (for example: multiple colon polyps)
  • Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with breast or ovarian cancer
  • A known familial mutation in a cancer predisposition syndrome gene
  • Concern about developing cancer because of family history
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What is BRCA 1&2 blood testing?

BRCA mutations are responsible for approximately half of the hereditary causes of breast cancer families and approximately 95% of families with both breast and ovarian cancer. While 20% to 30% of women with breast cancer have a family history of the condition, only 5-10% of all female breast cancer is hereditary.

Men may also develop breast cancer, accounting for less than 1% of all cases of breast cancer. A significant amount of male breast cancer is thought to be hereditary.

If BRCA testing reveals that an individual has a BRCA gene mutation, then their siblings and children have a 50% chance of having the mutation. Mutations can be inherited from either the individual’s mother or father. In addition, an individual who carries a mutation can still pass it on even if they did not develop cancer themselves.

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How is the genetic test BRCA performed?

Once family history and genetic counseling are completed, the patient is offered a blood test which is done in our office. Most insurances cover the cost of the blood test. The results are available in 3 weeks. Post-test visits include reviews of the results and proper follow-up care and management.

Genetic Testing For Colon Cancer

About 3% to 5% of colorectal cancers are believed to be caused by mutations in the genes. When someone carries a mutation in any of these genes, they have a condition called Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is also called hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC).

Knowing the potential risk of colon cancer can help the healthcare provider and patient make better, more informed decisions about the patient’s health before the onset of cancer or before a second cancer has a chance to develop. Testing should be considered for hereditary colon cancer if the patient:

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Has had colorectal or endometrial cancer before age 50

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Has had an abnormal MSI/IHC tumor test result (Colorectal/Endometrial)

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Has had two or more Lynch syndrome cancers at any age

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Has had a Lynch syndrome cancer as well as one or more relatives with a Lynch syndrome cancer

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Has a previously identified Lynch syndrome mutation in the family

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Has had two or more relatives with a Lynch syndrome cancer, one before the age of 50

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Has had three or more relatives with a Lynch syndrome cancer at any age

Helpful Links To Evaluate Your Cancer Risk

Hereditary Cancer Quiz
BRACAnalysis/HBOC
COLARIS/Lynch syndrome

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